Typewriter with Story button, vintageI should’ve done this before. I could’ve done this before. I would’ve done this before…shudda, cudda, wudda, eh? Never mind. It’s not quite the end of January yet so I can just about get away with this round-up of my adventures last year before lambs gamble in pastures green, buds burst forth from the trees, etc.

Right after New year’s Day I travelled to Manchester to begin work on a book with Maggie Oliver, the former police detective who blew the whistle on the Rochdale child abuse scandal after she witnessed a huge cover-up by police and social services. She resigned her job because of it, but has since been vindicated. Read the BBC news story here to find out more.

When I met her, Maggie had already been working with another ghostwriter but the results weren’t to her liking. So we started again, specifically on the complicated, controversial chapters that dealt with her growing recognition of the situation in Rochdale and her increasing discomfort at what she was seeing. However, Maggie speaks right from the heart and, armed with her account and a mountain of files and paperwork which evidenced her account, I was able to construct a path through the story to produce a clear and compelling narrative that has been critically very well received. Here it is on Amazon…

Maggie Oliver book pic

 

Maggie and I worked to a very tight deadline indeed but there was no cutting corners – she wanted this important story told in as much detail as possible, which included the coverage many aspects of her career and family life before the Rochdale scandal began to reveal itself. Not every reviewer appreciated this – wanting to get to the heart of the story, understandably – but I thought it was important to give background and context to why Maggie acted as she did. It made her human – a very important consideration in this story.

Anyway, Maggie was very pleased with the results and she wrote this about our experience of working together…

“I began writing my book ‘Survivors…. Maggie Oliver Fighting for Justice’ in 2018, and by late in the year it was clear I needed some help.

 

I was introduced to Tom and almost immediately I knew that I could trust him to write this really important story that needed to be told. My book was not only about my own personal life and the challenges that have been thrown my way, but it was also the story of how the police, social service, CPS and the establishment failed generations of vulnerable children who were groomed and sexually abused by organised gangs of predatory paedophiles.

Under incredible pressure to meet a looming deadline, Tom immersed himself in the detail of my story and studied the issues surrounding the Rochdale Grooming Scandal. I am personally very proud of the published book, and I know without a shadow of a doubt that without Tom’s professional expertise, guidance and encouragement the final product would have fallen far short of what I hoped to achieve.

Tom was kind, encouraging, professional and dedicated, working long hours to ensure a great outcome and I would now consider him a friend too. Should I ever decide to write a second book, I would definitely be seeking Tom’s help from the start next time!!

My heartfelt thanks and gratitude go to Tom…. and my book became an Amazon best seller too, which was the icing on the cake!!!”

Thanks, Maggie! We’ve stayed in touch since, and after publication I was invited to the launch of her charitable foundation at a swanky venue in Cheshire. Icing on the cake for me – quite literally!

Following that work I was contacted by a man called Nigel Roberts, who was keen to have his mother’s memories distilled into a book. He suggested afternoon tea at a hotel in Tetbury so I went along, met Nigel, his wife Bella, and his 92-year-old mother, Olive. From the start, I could see she had a twinkle in her eye and that she’d be a good storyteller – and I wasn’t wrong! Olive has had a fascinating life, from a very difficult start in the North East of England to her experiences in the Blitz and her subsequent meeting of the man she would marry. After the war he was drafted into the fledgling GCHQ and the couple spent many years posted abroad, mainly to the Far East. Olive’s account of her life is warm, engaging, insightful and funny, and she was an absolute pleasure to work with. Her book, ‘Stepping Stones’ is due to be published later this year and I’ll post on this again when the time comes.

In the midst of that I made contact with the literary agent Maggie Hanbury – a genuine legend in the publishing industry. She’s represented everyone from JG Ballard to Katie Price and she’s a forthright, insightful and very entertaining person. I wanted to talk to her about a project I’ve been working on – the story of a guy called John Chambers and his extraordinary upbringing in Belfast during the Troubles. John contacted me about four years ago with his story and straight away I was interested. Not only does it have a fast-paced narrative and an incredible twist, the man himself is a great storyteller, with more than a dash of the blackest Belfast humour. Back then we worked on a proposal but couldn’t attract any attention from the publishing world. Northern Ireland as the subject for a book was ‘over and done’, it seemed. Yet something really nagged me about this and whenever I met someone new, I told them about it. Luckily, I met Maggie Hanbury, who was immediately interested. She read the proposal, asked me to do more work on it (I was happy to oblige) and once that was completed, she said it out on submission. And we got a deal! Thank you, Bonnier Books for seeing what I always saw in John’s story.

I spent time at John’s home in the North of England, and we also travelled to Belfast to get a first-hand look at the places he grew up in. We had a terrific few days in what is surely one of the most interesting cities in the world, and I was definitely richer for the experience. What I saw and learned really helped with the narrative, particularly the Belfast accent and the complexity of the tribal divisions in the city, and from it John and I were able to craft a really excellent story. It’s out in May this year, and it will be called ‘A Belfast Child’.

All that took me up to late autumn, and with Christmas looming the pace slackened a bit – thank God! Now it’s January and again I’m on the lookout for a diamond of a story that might turn into a bestseller later this year or in 2021. So if you’re holding that diamond – whether you’re a publisher, commissioning editor or someone with an extraordinary experience to share – let me make it shine!!